What is hygge and why should we embrace it?

In Denmark hygge has been a part of everyday life for a long time.

Hygge is a Danish word which has no direct translation into English. Pronounced hoo-ga, it describes a positive feeling of cosiness, contentment and embracing the moment. Meik Wiking, author of The Little Book of Hygge, says that hygge is an essential part of the Danish identity, describing it as “an integral part of the national DNA”.

The beauty of hygge is that there are no rules to follow or expensive products to buy, instead it is about slowing down, living in the present and taking time to appreciate the simple things in life. The concept was born in Denmark where the winters are long, cold and dark and people had to find ways to break up the monotony and find happiness.

Bring hygge into your life

You can experience hygge simply by doing something which gives you a warm, happy feeling inside. Look at ways to turn an ordinary day into a joyful one. This could be snuggling up under a blanket on your favourite armchair or sofa and reading a book or listening to a piece of music. You may just want to take time to make a good cup of coffee or create a positive ritual like lighting a candle for dinner or ending the day with a relaxing bath.

Focus on ways you can make your home more cosy. Choose comfortable armchairs and sofas where you can unwind and add blankets, throws and cushions to make yourself feel even more snug. Invite friends round for an evening in and enjoy good food and even better conversation. Or if you’d prefer to be alone, put on your favourite pair of pyjamas and while away a weekend reading a book or watching a box set you love.

Reap the benefits of a Danish lifestyle

Danish people prioritise getting a good nights’ sleep, which is good for health and wellbeing as well as happiness levels. Exercise is also part of the daily routine in Denmark with one in five commuters heading to work on their bikes. This could be why Denmark has been in the top three countries in the World Happiness Report for seven years running.

An essential part of hygge is to slow down and appreciate what you have, focusing on genuine relationships and connections with people. One way to do this is to step away from social media for a while and socialise with friends face-to-face instead.

Set aside time regularly to do something you enjoy – clearing your diary for some me-time can help you feel less stressed and more able to tackle any challenges.

In Denmark hygge has been a part of everyday life for a long time.

Hygge is a Danish word which has no direct translation into English. Pronounced hoo-ga, it describes a positive feeling of cosiness, contentment and embracing the moment. Meik Wiking, author of The Little Book of Hygge, says that hygge is an essential part of the Danish identity, describing it as “an integral part of the national DNA”.

The beauty of hygge is that there are no rules to follow or expensive products to buy, instead it is about slowing down, living in the present and taking time to appreciate the simple things in life. The concept was born in Denmark where the winters are long, cold and dark and people had to find ways to break up the monotony and find happiness.

Bring hygge into your life

You can experience hygge simply by doing something which gives you a warm, happy feeling inside. Look at ways to turn an ordinary day into a joyful one. This could be snuggling up under a blanket on your favourite armchair or sofa and reading a book or listening to a piece of music. You may just want to take time to make a good cup of coffee or create a positive ritual like lighting a candle for dinner or ending the day with a relaxing bath.

Focus on ways you can make your home more cosy. Choose comfortable armchairs and sofas where you can unwind and add blankets, throws and cushions to make yourself feel even more snug. Invite friends round for an evening in and enjoy good food and even better conversation. Or if you’d prefer to be alone, put on your favourite pair of pyjamas and while away a weekend reading a book or watching a box set you love.

Reap the benefits of a Danish lifestyle

Danish people prioritise getting a good nights’ sleep, which is good for health and wellbeing as well as happiness levels. Exercise is also part of the daily routine in Denmark with one in five commuters heading to work on their bikes. This could be why Denmark has been in the top three countries in the World Happiness Report for seven years running.

An essential part of hygge is to slow down and appreciate what you have, focusing on genuine relationships and connections with people. One way to do this is to step away from social media for a while and socialise with friends face-to-face instead.

Set aside time regularly to do something you enjoy – clearing your diary for some me-time can help you feel less stressed and more able to tackle any challenges.